IPiB Courses

 

500 Level Courses

575 THE BIOLOGY OF VIRUSES (Also MMI 575)
Spring; 2 cr. The goal of this course is to introduce upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students to the biology and biochemistry of viruses and virus infection. We will address the fundamentals of virus properties, virus multiplication, disease mechanisms, prevention and intervention of infection, and how viruses pose new threats to human and animal health through emergence and evolution. We will focus primarily on viruses that are pathogenic to animals. This course is intended to cover important concepts and themes in virology. We will discuss carefully selected examples of viruses that impact our world and everyday life. Thus, this course will not be a "bug per day" style of class. Prerequisite: Biocore 301/302; or AP score of 4 or 5 and Zoology 151 or 152; or MM&I 301 (Sample Syllabus) Paul Friesen and Andrew Mehle

Meets Requirements: Graduate students must concurrently enroll in Biochem 910 in order to receive graduate-level course credit. Please refer to the course syllabus.


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600 Level Courses

601 PROTEIN AND ENZYME STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
Fall; 2 cr. Protein structure and function, protein folding, and organic chemistry of enzymatic catalysis. Designed for graduate students and upper level undergraduate students in biochemistry or related disciplines. Prerequisites:  Chem 345 and Biochem 501 or 507. [Sample syllabus] Hazel Holden and Ivan Rayment

Meets Requirements: Physical


606 MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY (Also Math/BMI/BMC 606)
Fall, even years; 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological structures. Mathematical techniques include ordinary and partial differential equations, 3D Fourier analysis and optimization. Biological applications include protein folding, molecular dynamics, implicit solvent electrostatics, and molecular interactions. In order to count toward the minimum graduate course requirement, graduate students will be required to give an oral presentation in Biochem 906 ("Modeling for Biochemical Systems" advanced seminar) during the last few weeks of class. Prerequisites: Math 234 or Math 320, and either CompSci 301 or CompSci 302. [Sample Syllabus] Julie Mitchell

Meets Requirements: Physical


609 MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SYSTEMS BIOLOGY (Also Math/BMI/BMC 609)
Spring, even years; 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological systems. Mathematical techniques include dynamical systems and differential equations. Applications to biological pathways, including understanding of bistability within chemical reaction systems, are emphasized. In order to count towards the minimum graduate course requirement, graduate students will be required to complete a final project. Prerequisites: Math 340 or 341; Math 415; or consent of instructor. [Sample syllabus] Gheorghe Craciun

Meets Requirements: Physical


612 PROKARYOTIC MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (Also Microbio/Genetics 612)
Fall; 3 cr. Molecular basis of bacterial physiology and genetics with emphasis on molecular mechanisms; topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, transcription, translation, replication, recombination, regulation of gene expression. Prerequisites: Micro 470 or equivalent, and Biochem 501 or equivalent. Richard Gourse, James Keck, and Robert Landick

Meets Requirements: Biological


619 ADVANCED NUTRITION: INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM OF MACRONUTRIENTS (Also Nutri Sci 619)
Spring; 3 cr. Discuss metabolic control; gastrointestinal physiology; nutrient absorption; molecular, cellular, organismal aspects of glucose transport, metabolism, regulation; fuel sensing; molecular regulation of fatty acid, lipid metabolism; cellular, organismal aspects of protein metabolism; hormonal control of metabolism; experimental approaches for studying metabolism. James Ntambi and Richard Eisenstein

Meets Requirements: Biological


620 EUKARYOTIC MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (Also CRB 620)
Spring; 3 cr. This course focuses on the basic molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA, RNA, and protein metabolism in eukaryotic organisms. The course is intended for advanced undergrads and first-year graduate students with a firm knowledge of basic biochemistry. Prerequisites: Graduate student standing or Biochem 501 or 508. [Sample syllabus] Aseem Ansari and David Wassarman

Meets Requirements: Biological


621 PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY (Also Botany 621)
Spring, odd years; 3 cr. Lectures. Biochemistry of photosynthesis, respiration, cell walls, and other metabolic and biosynthetic processes in plants. Prerequisites: Biochem 501 or 507 or consent of instructor. [Sample syllabus] Sebastian Bednarek, John Ralph and Hiroshi Maeda

Meets Requirements: Biological


625 MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF VITAMINS AND MINERALS
Spring; 2 cr. Course emphasizes the importance of coenzyme and cofactors of enzymes (i.e., vitamins and minerals) in biochemistry. All aspects of the biochemistry of enzymes will be covered, including their biosynthesis as far as is known, the biochemical reactions they catalyze, their chemical and spectroscopic properties, and the mechanisms by which they facilitate biochemical reactions. Prerequisites: Chemistry 343 and 345 or equivalent, and Biochem 501 or equivalent, and Chemistry 561 or 565 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). Brian Fox, Hazel Holden, Ivan Rayment

Meets Requirements: Physical


627 (BMC) Methods and Technologies for Protein Characterization (Also Chem 627)
Spring, odd-numbered years; 2 or 3 cr. (For 3 credits, students need to complete the lab portion.) This course seeks to engage students interested in both chemical instrumentation and those who desire to apply proteomic technologies to current biological problems.  Understanding the current proteomics landscape, the limitations of these technologies and their practical application are among the course learning objectives. Emphasis is placed on understanding the very latest cutting-edge research. [Sample syllabus] Joshua Coon

Meets Requirements: Physical


630 CELLULAR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION MECHANISMS (Also Phmcol-m/ Zoology 630)
Fall; 3 cr. Lecture-discussion. Comprehensive coverage of hormones, growth factors and other regulators; emphasis on hormone and growth factor receptors, action in cytoplasm and nucleus, and their biosynthesis. Prerequisites: Introductory biochemistry (Biochem 501 or 507 & 508) and cell biology (Biocore 303 or Zool 570 or Path 750). [Sample syllabus] Thomas Martin, Arnold Ruoho, Beth Weaver, Richard Anderson, Shigeki Miyamoto, and Emery Bresnick

Meets Requirements: Biological


645 MOLECULAR CONTROL OF METABOLISM AND METABOLIC DISEASE
Fall; 3 cr. Examination of various physiological states and how they affect metabolic pathways. Discussion of a number of special topics related to the unique roles of various tissues and to metabolic pathways in disease states, including adipocyte biology, beta-cell biology, epigenetics, inflammation, and aging related diseases. Intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with introductory biochemistry knowledge. (Sample Syllabus) Alan Attie, Rozalyn Anderson, Feyza Engin, Dudley Lamming, Matthew Merrins

Meets Requirements: Biological


660 METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY
Fall; 2 cr. Survey of modern techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry. Prerequisites: 2 semesters of organic chemistry, and intermediate or advanced biochemistry / molecular biology, and consent of instructor. Required for first-year IPiB graduate students. Marvin Wickens and Ann Palmenberg

Meets Requirements: Required for first-year IPiB students


665 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (Also Chem 665)
Fall, Spring odd years; 4 cr. Taught together with the advanced (honors) undergraduate course Chemistry 565, this course develops the principles of solution thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, and applies this quantitative framework to discuss experimental data and analysis of the thermodynamics (driving forces, coupled conformational changes, etc.) and mechanisms of biochemical processes involving proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in solution. Applications include protein folding, nucleic acid helix formation, micelle formation; ligand binding, cooperative binding and other assembly processes; effects of water, salts, other solutes, temperature and pressure on biochemical processes; protein-nucleic acid interactions and enzyme catalysis. Weekly problem sets develop these applications. Typical Fall semester enrollment is 20 – 25 graduate students and 75 – 85 undergraduate students. Students in this course are expected to have some previous background in physical chemistry as well as the Chem 565 prerequisites. Tom Record (Fall), Silvia Cavagnero or James Weissbaar (Alternating Spring)

Meets Requirements: Physical


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700 Level Courses

701 PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY (Also BMC 701)
Fall; 1 cr. Training for the practical aspects of being a scientist. Will cover ethics, peer review, grant writing, science communication, career alternatives, paper writing, experimental design, research documentation, science funding, academic-private interface, scientific fraud, social media responsibility and more. Prerequisite: Admission to IPiB or the Biophysics graduate program. Required for first-year IPiB graduate students. [Sample syllabus] Michael Cox

Meets Requirements: Required for first-year IPiB students


704 CHEMICAL BIOLOGY (Also Chem 704)
Fall; 2 cr. Structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates; application of organic chemistry to problems in cell biology, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Prerequisites: Biochem 501 or equivalent, 1 year of organic chemistry and consent of instructor. Andrew Buller

Meets Requirements: Physical


720 (BMC) EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND PARADIGMS IN CELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
Spring; 3 cr. A literature-based course taught in module format and covering the following areas from historical to modern contexts: Biochemistry of post-translational modification of proteins, model organisms, transcriptional switches, chromosome replication, RNA in biological regulation.

Graduate students only, and required for first-year IPiB students.


726 REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN PROKARYOTES (Also Micro 726)
Irregular, 3 cr. An intensive examination of a limited number of systems to illustrate the range of molecular mechanisms utilized to control gene expression in bacteria. Prerequisites: Micro/Genetics/Biochem 612. Karen Wassarman

Meets Requirements: Biological


729.001 ADVANCED TOPICS (Also BMC 901): IPiB SEMINAR
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Weekly seminar series in which IPiB students, generally in their fourth or fifth year, present their thesis research progress to faculty and fellow students. IPiB students are required to enroll in this course twice during their graduate studies: one for participation only, and the other for one presentation and participation. "Participation" includes class discussion, mandatory attendance, and evaluation of student presenters after each seminar. Margaret Clagett-Dame and Alessandro Senes; Catherine Fox and Melissa Harrison (alternating years)

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


729.002 ADVANCED TOPICS: PRACTICUM IN UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. An opportunity to lead a seminar section of Biochemistry 551, in which undergraduate Biochemistry majors present a seminar on a research paper. Participation in this course provides graduate students with an opportunity to gain additional teaching experience and undergraduates with help in improving their presentation skills. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Alessandro Senes, Srivatsan Raman, and Lynne Prost

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


729.006 ADVANCED TOPICS: FROM ATOMS TO MOLECULES
Fall; 3 cr. In addition to providing a foundation of biochemical knowledge, this course is designed to help first-semester graduate students transition from an undergraduate consumer of knowledge to a graduate student and future independent scientist who will discover and add new knowledge. The student objectives are to 1) develop basic knowledge of the chemical principles underlying the structure, dynamics, interaction, and function of biological molecules; 2) learn how experimental data are analyzed, interpreted, tested and shared; and 3) understand how biochemical knowledge develops from experimental data. [Sample Syllabus] Katie Henzler-Wildman, Ivan Rayment

Meets Requirements: Required for and currently open only to first-year IPiB graduate students


729.007 ADVANCED TOPICS: FOUNDATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY
Fall; 2 cr. An overview of the foundations of the biotechnology industry, technology transfer, the basics on patents and protection of intellectual property, business development cycle, and other topics. Other tools and perspectives for becoming successful participants in the biotechnology arena include guidance on preparing effective oral, visual and written presentations. The course instructors bring in outside experts from the university and local business community to enhance these discussions. Required of first-year Biotechnology Training Program (BTP) trainees. Instructor consent required. Brian G. Fox


729.008 ADVANCED TOPICS: RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. This course is designed to fulfill the responsible conduct of research (RCR) training required by NIH and NSF. Graduate students and postdocs supported by NIH or NSF funds are required to take RCR training once every four years. Brian G. Fox and various guest speakers from across campus


729.009 MEMBRANE PROTEIN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION (Advanced)
Spring; 1 cr. Membrane proteins comprise over a fourth of proteins encoded in any given genome, providing many vital functions to all cells. For example, ion channels and pumps modulate the membrane potential and help conduct information via nerves and other long distance conducting tissue. Transporters mediate the uptake and secretion of molecules. Receptors, such as G protein coupled receptors and receptor protein kinases, transfer information about the environment to the inside of the cell   Membrane proteins also contribute to the shape of the cell, the structure of the membrane and a myriad of other functions. This seminar course addresses structure/function relationships for this critical class of proteins, addressing questions such as “how do membrane proteins fold?”, “how do certain important classes of membrane proteins work?”, “what are the challenges in studying membrane proteins” and “what methods are available for studying their biophysical properties?”

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


799 PRACTICUM IN BIOCHEMISTRY TEACHING
Fall, Spring; 1-3 cr. Training and practice in instruction in biochemistry and molecular biology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Marv Wickens

Meets Requirements: Inside seminar presentation


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800 Level Courses

800 PRACTICAL NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE THEORY
Fall; 2 cr. Lectures. Multiple pulse NMR, off-resonance effects, composite and shaped pulses, product operators, coherence transfer, multi-dimensional NMR, phase cycling, multiple quantum coherence, and cross relaxation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [Web site] Milo Westler

Meets Requirements: Physical


801 BIOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE
Spring; 2 cr. Lectures. Survey of current nuclear magnetic resonance techniques used in biochemical research; the emphasis will be on how data are acquired and on practical applications. Prerequisite: Undergraduates accepted with consent of instructor. [Sample syllabus] John Markley

Meets Requirements: Physical


840 REGULATORY MECHANISMS IN PLANT DEVELOPMENT (Also Botany/Genetics 840)
Fall, even years; 3 cr. Molecular mechanisms whereby endogenous and environmental regulatory factors control development; emphasis on stimulus perception and primary events in the signal chain leading to modulated gene expression and cellular development. Prerequisites: Biochem 501 or 601 and Botany 500; or Biocore 301 and 323. Richard Amasino, Patrick Masson and Donna Fernandez

Meets Requirements: Biological


872 SEMINAR - SELECTED TOPICS IN MACROMOLECULAR AND BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (Also Chem 872)
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Biochemistry 872 is an advanced graduate topics course (seminar/discussion format) based on recent literature in biophysical sciences. The course focuses on biophysical techniques, including optical microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and electrophysiology. Students in 872 present and discuss recent examples of biological questions that have been approached using these tools. Prerequisites: Biochem/Chem 665 or consent of instructor. Meyer Jackson

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


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900 Level Courses

901 SEMINAR - NUTRITION AND METABOLISM (Advanced) (Also Nutri Science 901)
Fall; 1 cr. Presentation of original research results; discussion of recent articles in animal metabolism and nutrition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Alan Attie, Rick Eisenstein, James Ntambi, and David Pagliarini

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


906 MODELING FOR BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMS
Fall; 1 cr. Participants discuss topics relevant to predictive modeling of biochemical systems. Students will present published or in-progress works on quantitative approaches to studying biomolecular systems at various scales. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Julie Mitchell and Alessandro Senes. In Fall 2016, course meets with the QBio Seminar Series, Wednesdays at 2:00pm in the Orchard Room, 3rd Floor of the WIDhttp://wid.wisc.edu/research/sysbio/seminars/.

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


909 SEMINAR - ENZYMOLOGY - STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION (Advanced)
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Research reports, special topics, and reports from recent literature in enzymology and enzyme mechanisms. Samuel Butcher, Brian Fox, Hazel Holden, and Ivan Rayment

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


910 SEMINAR - MOLECULAR VIROLOGY (Advanced)
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Research reports, special topics and reports from recent literature in molecular virology. Paul Ahlquist, Paul Friesen, Robert Kalejta, and Ann Palmenberg

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


912 SEMINAR - MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DEVELOPMENT (Advanced)
Fall; 1 cr. Classical and current papers concerning molecular and genetic mechanisms of eukaryotic development will be presented and discussed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Judith Kimble

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


913 SEMINAR - RIBOGROUP (Advanced) (Also BMC 913)
Spring; 1 cr. Student-led discussions of RNA-related problems. Prerequisites: Biochem 603, Genetics 466 or equivalent; consent of instructor. David Brow, Marvin Wickens and Sam Butcher

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


914 SEMINAR - MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCES TRAINING PROGRAM (Also Micro, MM&I, and BMC 914)
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. During the Fall semester, Molecular Biosciences trainees in their second year of graduate training will present seminars based primarily on literature related to their projects. During the Spring semester, Molecular Biosciences trainees in their third year of graduate training will present seminars based primarily on their own research. Prerequisite: None. Christina Hull

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


915 SEMINAR - COMPUTATION AND INFORMATICS IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE (Also BMI/BME/CBE/Comp Sci/Genetics 915)
Spring; 1 cr. Participants and outside speakers will discuss current research in computation and informatics in biology and medicine. Required of all CIBM program trainees. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Charles Page, Louise Pape and Jude Shavlik

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


916 SEMINAR - CELLULAR MECHANISMS OF PROTEIN AND MEMBRANE BIOGENESIS AND TRAFFICKING (Advanced)
Spring; 1 cr. Recent literature relating to cellular aspects of the regulation of protein and membrane biogenesis including protein synthesis, folding, modification, degradation, sorting and trafficking, as well as aspects of molecular chaperone function and membrane trafficking, will be presented and discussed. Prerequisite: Grad students only or consent of instructor. Sebastian Bednarek and Thomas Martin

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


917 SEMINAR - REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION (Advanced) (Also Micro 917)
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Participants will discuss recent literature in topics related to prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene regulation. These topics include but are not limited to regulation of transcription, translation, and genome organization. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Robert Landick and Richard Gourse

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


918 SEMINAR - SINGLE MOLECULE APPROACHES TO BIOLOGY (Also Chem 918)
Fall; 1 cr. Single Molecule Approaches to Biology. A combination of recent literature and original research presentations relating to the use of single molecule techniques in biochemistry including fluorescence microscopy, tethered particle motion, patch-clamping, cryo-electron microscopy, optical trapping, magnetic tweezers, and super resolution microscopy. Aaron Hoskins, James Weisshaar, and Randall Goldsmith.

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


932 SEMINAR - BIOTECHNOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAM (Also Mirco/CBE 932)
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Biotechnology Training Program (BTP) trainees will present their research for critical review by the audience. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing. Required of all BTP trainees. Brian Fox

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


945 SEMINAR - CHEMICAL BIOLOGY (Advanced) (Also Chem 945)
Spring; 1 cr. Recent published research in chemical biology and related areas. Intended for advanced graduate students, and required of all NIH Chemistry-Biology Interface (CBI) trainees. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Laura Kiessling, Ronald Raines and Douglas Weibel

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


990 ADVANCED RESEARCH
Fall, Spring, Summer; 1-12 cr. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Meets Requirements: Required


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Other Approved Courses





571 (STAT) STATISTICAL METHODS FOR BIOSCIENCE I
Fall, 3 credits. Descriptive statistics, distributions, one- and two-sample normal inference, power, one-way ANOVA, simple linear regression, categorical data, non-parametric methods; underlying assumptions and diagnostic work.  Prereq>  College algebra, graduate standing. Murray Clayton

Meets Requirements: Quantitative


607 (MICRO/GEN) ADVANCED MICROBIAL GENETICS
Spring, 3 credits. Molecular genetic methods and related aspects of prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic biology, as well as critical analysis of the scientific literature. Approximately two-thirds of the course will focus on prokaryotes and one-third on lower eukaryotic microbes. Prereq> Genetics 466 or equiv, Biochem 501 or equiv, & Grad st or cons inst. Jue D. (Jade) Wang

Meets Requirements: Biological


619 (BME) MICROSCOPY OF LIFE (Also ANATOMY, CHEM, MED PHYS, PHMCOL-M, PHYSICS, RADIOL)
Fall, 3 credits. Survey of state of the art microscopic, cellular and molecular imaging techniques, beginning with subcellular microscopy and finishing with whole animal imaging. Prereq> second semester intro physics including light and optics or consent of instructor. Paul Campagnola

Meets Requirements: Physical


640 (CRB) FUNDAMENTALS OF STEM CELL & REGENERATIVE BIOLOGY
Spring, 3 credits. Emery Bresnick and Timothy Kamp

Meets Requirements: Biological


668 (CHEM) BIOPHYSICAL SPECTROSCOPY
Fall, odd years, 2-3 credits. Survey of spectroscopic techniques used in the quantitative analysis of biological systems, including basic principles, key applications and cutting-edge advances. Silvia Cavagnero

Meets Requirements: Physical


668 (BACT) MICROBIOLOGY AT ATOMIC RESOLUTION (Also BMC 668)
Spring, 3 credits. Three-dimensional protein structures form the basis for discussions of high resolution microbiology; how particular problems are solved with given protein architectures and chemistries and how themes of protein structure are modified and recycled. Prereq> Biochemistry (e.g. Biochem 501), molecular biology (e.g. Micro 526 or 612) required, one semester of physical chemistry preferred. Katrina Forest

Meets Requirements: Physical


703 (ONCOLOGY) CARCINOGENESIS AND TUMOR CELL BIOLOGY
Fall, 3 credits. Course description. Wei Xu (Course Director)

Meets Requirements: Biological


750 (PATH) CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY / PATHOLOGY
Spring, 3 credits. Aparna Lakkaraju, Ricardo Lloyd, Shelby O’Connor, Donna Peters, Deric Wheeler

Meets Requirements: Biological


751 (PATH) CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF AGING
This course starts by examining the molecular, cellular, physiological and clinical aspects of aging. Following this introduction to aging, the remainder of the course focuses on the etiology of the major diseases of human aging that together account for more than 70% of all deaths. Throughout the course, aging, and age-related diseases, are examined via the combined expertise of basic scientists and clinicians. For each major disease there will be three seminars. The first seminar will introduce the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of the disease, with the next lecture focusing on the current clinical treatments of major human diseases. The last session will consist of additional information on the topic, or a review of current research papers addressing disease pathogenesis and treatment. The course is designed for graduate students, M.D. or M.D./Ph.D. students, advanced undergraduates and clinical fellows interested in understanding the biology of aging and how it relates to translational and clinical research. The major human diseases covered will include sarcopenia, brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease, heart and vascular disease, hormonal aging, cancer, rheumatology, stroke, diabetes, asthma and COPD, ending with the role of growth signaling in biology of aging.

Meets Requirements: Biological


776 (BMI) ADVANCED BIOINFORMATICS (also Comp Sci 776)
Spring, 3 credits. Advanced course covering computational problems in molecular biology. The course will study algorithms for problems such as: modeling sequence classes and features, phylogenetic tree construction, gene-expression data analysis, protein and RNA structure prediction, and whole-genome analysis and comparisons. Prereq BMI 576

Meets Requirements: Physical


783 (CBE) DESIGN OF BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES
Spring, 3 cr. Introduction to the methodologies for engineering the structure and function of biological molecules, especially proteins. Students will develop an understanding for the integration of computation and experiment to address biological molecular engineering problems. Prereq> Biocore 303 or Biochem 501 or Zoology 570. Eric Shusta

Meets Requirements: Biological


860 (BOTANY) PLANT CELL BIOLOGY
Spring (occasionally) 2 cr. Structure/function relationships at the cellular level. Topics include the biogenesis of organelles, vesicle traffic, ion transport and signalling processes, and organization of the cytoskeleton and cell wall. Prerequisite: Botany 500 or Biochem 501 or 601. Sebastian Bednarek, Donna Fernandez

Meets Requirements: Biological


875 (Life Sciences Communications) SPECIAL TOPICS
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. Special topics to help scientists better communicate their research to various audiences. Topics and instructors vary.

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


931 (NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES) SEMINAR: NUTRITION
Fall, Spring; 1 cr. This interdisciplinary course complements the more focused Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Nutritional Sciences (IGPNS) emphasis group seminars and other IGPNS courses with expert presentations of current research methods and data and issue-based applications. NS 931 speakers address topics that represent the breadth of nutrition, a field that investigates complex problems from molecules to communities. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Denise Ney and Brian Parks

Meets Requirements: Continuous Seminar Enrollment


950 (BOTANY) XYLEM STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
Fall, 1 credit. Journal club format focused on whole-plant or eco-physiological aspects of water transport and stress in plants. Katherine McCulloh

Meets Requirements: Continuous seminar enrollment


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